Research Spotlight

Posted December 15th 2019

Insights into the January 2020 Issue of the Journal of Endodontics.

Gerald N. Glickman, M.S.

Gerald N. Glickman, M.S.

Azarpazhooh, A., A. R. Diogenes, A. F. Fouad, G. N. Glickman, M. K. Kang, A. Kishen, L. Levin, R. S. Roda, C. M. Sedgley, F. R. Tay and K. M. Hargreaves (2019). “Insights into the January 2020 Issue of the Journal of Endodontics.” J Endod Nov 29. [Epub ahead of print].

Full text of this article.

Welcome to the January 2020 issue of the Journal of Endodontics ( JOE ). Here, we share some of our favorite articles that are published in this issue of the journal. We hope you look forward to reading these and other articles in JOE. [Excerpt from Article].


Posted December 15th 2019

Insights into the December 2019 Issue of the Journal of Endodontics.

Gerald N. Glickman, M.S.

Gerald N. Glickman, M.S.

Azarpazhooh, A., A. R. Diogenes, A. F. Fouad, G. N. Glickman, M. K. Kang, A. Kishen, L. Levin, R. S. Roda, C. M. Sedgley, F. R. Tay and K. M. Hargreaves (2019). “Insights into the December 2019 Issue of the Journal of Endodontics.” J Endod 45(12): 1433-1434.

Full text of this article.

Welcome to the December 2019 issue of the Journal of Endodontics ( JOE ). Here, we share some of our favorite articles that are published in this issue of the journal. We hope you look forward to reading these and other articles in JOE. [Excerpt from Article].


Posted December 15th 2019

The association between smoking and periapical periodontitis: a systematic review.

James Leo Gutmann, D.D.S.

James Leo Gutmann, D.D.S.

Aminoshariae, A., J. Kulild and J. Gutmann (2019). “The association between smoking and periapical periodontitis: a systematic review.” Clin Oral Investig Nov 26. [Epub ahead of print]

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OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this systematic review was to examine if, in adult patients, the absence or presence of smoking influenced the prevalence of periapical periodontitis (PP). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Databases were searched, and original research manuscripts up to June 2019 were identified by two reviewers. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) was used for risk of bias. The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system was used for certainty in the evidence. A meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5 software. Risk ratio (RR) was used for the cohort studies, and odds ratio (OR) was used for the case-control studies with 95% confidence interval (CI). RESULTS: All the studies had many covariates and confounding variables. Three longitudinal cohort articles discussed radiographic findings as they related to the prevalence of PP in root-filled teeth. The RR of smoking and the prevalence of PP was 2.11 (95% CI 0.88-5.05, p = 0.09). Nine case-control studies focused on the prevalence of PP and smoking. There was a positive association between smoking and the prevalence of PP with an OR of 2.78 and a 95% confidence interval of 2.23-3.48, with p value < 0.05. The quality of the studies was fair per NOS, and the certainty of the literature assessment was moderate per GRADE. CONCLUSIONS: The current best available evidence suggests that smoking was associated with the prevalence of PP but more studies are needed to report this association in the longitudinal cohort studies. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Smoking has a positive association with the prevalence of PP.


Posted December 15th 2019

Secondary Management of Midface Fractures.

Likith V. Reddy, M.D.

Likith V. Reddy, M.D.

Aman, H., T. Shokri, L. V. Reddy and Y. Ducic (2019). “Secondary Management of Midface Fractures.” Facial Plast Surg 35(6): 640-644.

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Secondary reconstruction of posttraumatic facial deformities has been consistently described as one of the most challenging procedures performed. Ideal primary reconstruction cannot always be achieved, and often it is complicated by severe comminution or inadequate surgical management. It also can arise because of a lack of definitive surgical repair or excessive delay of initial treatment. Complications leading to secondary deformities can occur even when craniofacial injuries are treated by experienced surgeons. Following proper surgical principles, meticulous perioperative planning, and anticipation of potential functional and aesthetic sequelae limit many of those complications. Herein, we discuss secondary procedures in traumatic midface injuries.


Posted November 15th 2019

Percutaneous coronary intervention versus coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with three-vessel or left main coronary artery disease: 10-year follow-up of the multicentre randomised controlled SYNTAX trial.

Michael J. Mack M.D.
Michael J. Mack M.D.

Thuijs, D., A. P. Kappetein, P. W. Serruys, F. W. Mohr, M. C. Morice, M. J. Mack, D. R. Holmes, Jr., N. Curzen, P. Davierwala, T. Noack, M. Milojevic, K. D. Dawkins, B. R. da Costa, P. Juni and S. J. Head (2019). “Percutaneous coronary intervention versus coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with three-vessel or left main coronary artery disease: 10-year follow-up of the multicentre randomised controlled SYNTAX trial.” Lancet 394(10206): 1325-1334.

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BACKGROUND: The Synergy between PCI with Taxus and Cardiac Surgery (SYNTAX) trial was a non-inferiority trial that compared percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using first-generation paclitaxel-eluting stents with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in patients with de-novo three-vessel and left main coronary artery disease, and reported results up to 5 years. We now report 10-year all-cause death results. METHODS: The SYNTAX Extended Survival (SYNTAXES) study is an investigator-driven extension of follow-up of a multicentre, randomised controlled trial done in 85 hospitals across 18 North American and European countries. Patients with de-novo three-vessel and left main coronary artery disease were randomly assigned (1:1) to the PCI group or CABG group. Patients with a history of PCI or CABG, acute myocardial infarction, or an indication for concomitant cardiac surgery were excluded. The primary endpoint of the SYNTAXES study was 10-year all-cause death, which was assessed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Prespecified subgroup analyses were performed according to the presence or absence of left main coronary artery disease and diabetes, and according to coronary complexity defined by core laboratory SYNTAX score tertiles. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03417050. FINDINGS: From March, 2005, to April, 2007, 1800 patients were randomly assigned to the PCI (n=903) or CABG (n=897) group. Vital status information at 10 years was complete for 841 (93%) patients in the PCI group and 848 (95%) patients in the CABG group. At 10 years, 244 (27%) patients had died after PCI and 211 (24%) after CABG (hazard ratio 1.17 [95% CI 0.97-1.41], p=0.092). Among patients with three-vessel disease, 151 (28%) of 546 had died after PCI versus 113 (21%) of 549 after CABG (hazard ratio 1.41 [95% CI 1.10-1.80]), and among patients with left main coronary artery disease, 93 (26%) of 357 had died after PCI versus 98 (28%) of 348 after CABG (0.90 [0.68-1.20], pinteraction=0.019). There was no treatment-by-subgroup interaction with diabetes (pinteraction=0.66) and no linear trend across SYNTAX score tertiles (ptrend=0.30). INTERPRETATION: At 10 years, no significant difference existed in all-cause death between PCI using first-generation paclitaxel-eluting stents and CABG. However, CABG provided a significant survival benefit in patients with three-vessel disease, but not in patients with left main coronary artery disease. FUNDING: German Foundation of Heart Research (SYNTAXES study, 5-10-year follow-up) and Boston Scientific Corporation (SYNTAX study, 0-5-year follow-up).